Altman Weil

The perfect storm for #OldLaw?

In my last post I mentioned that I may post some further thought I had on this year’s Altman Weil Chief Legal Officer Survey.

One further comment on the Survey findings I did want to make relates to what I consider to be ‘the perfect storm’ brewing for the so-called #OldLaw or Traditional Law firm model.

And the best thing about this post is that my point can be made by showing you the following three easy to read charts from the Survey:

Chart 1

QUESTION: What are the chances you’ll be spending more money with me – your outside counsel – in the medium to long-term?

aw-1

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ANSWER: Not an awful lot!

Chart 2

QUESTION: If you are not giving me – your outside counsel – the work, then who are you giving it to (ie, who is my main competitor)?

 

aw2

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ANSWER: Yourself!

Chart 3

QUESTION: When you do give me work, what are the chances that you are going to ask me for a discount?

aw3

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ANSWER: Very likely indeed!

Have to say, reading these three charts I’m left with the feeling that outside counsel are in for a very rough ride unless they are 100% focussed on what they want to do, and who they want to do it for!

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The BIG takeout from this year’s Altman Weil CLO Survey

Altman Weil published the 2016 edition of its Chief Legal Officer Survey overnight Australian time. I may well post some more of my thoughts on this year’s content in the coming days, but what I wanted to share with you immediately is what I consider to be one of the most damning charts I have ever seen as it relates to business development, legal spend, and client relationship management:

altman-weil-clo-survey

That’s right, when asked the question:

Considering the ten law firms that receive the largest portion of your outside counsel spend, in the last 12 months how many of those firms have provided you with an analysis of spending data that was useful to your law department?

An overwhelming majority of CLOs (73%) responded “none”.

So, if you work for a law firm looking to differentiate your services; then the answer is it really isn’t that difficult.

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Hourly billing – A dialogue with John Chisholm

In the concluding paragraph to a LinkedIn post he made Friday, 2 September – title ’10 rules about hourly billing for law firms’, in which he sets out the rules of US-based blogger Matthew Homann as they apply to hourly billing – my good friend, and sometime mentor, John Chisholm asks:

“Are we changing the “we sell time” mindset and business model of the legal profession? Are we changing it quick enough?”

I believe John’s questions to be important and worthy of a response. So here’s mine.

Are we changing the “we sell time” mindset of the legal profession?

“If aren’t selling time, what are we selling?”

Many would say that lawyers sell their expertise, knowledge, skill, and experience.

While I would have held that to be true pre-2008, in the new world order I no longer believe that to be the case and would hold that today this type of thinking makes it incredibly difficult for you to differentiate yourself from the pack. I’d go so far as to say that in today’s world expertise, knowledge, skill and experience are a given: they merely get you an invitation to the dance.

No, short of a nuclear event or a commoditised issue, what lawyers (and business development people on their behalf) sell today is access to the right expertise, knowledge, skill and experience. And we do this by fulfilling on all of the modern day clichés: – understanding our clients’ businesses, being client-focussed, always being available, always adding value to the relationship.

The problem though is that even if we know what we are selling, how we charge for it is a very different beast.

Are we changing the “we sell time” business model of the legal profession?

In the 2016 edition of ‘Law Firms in Transition’ by Altman Weil the researches asked:

“If your firm uses any non-hourly based billing, is your use of alternative fee arrangements primarily reactive (in response to client requests) or primarily proactive (arising from your belief in the competitive advantage of alternative fees)?”

72.2% of law firm leaders responded – “reactive“.

In an era where “Sixty-four percent of large firms have added a Pricing Director or staff equivalent” (see page (v) of the report), that’s pretty staggering. But it also goes to the heart of the problem: there clearly isn’t significant enough incentive to move away from what is in place (hourly billing) and towards something new – and the reality is we are only offering non-hourly fee arrangements under the very real threat of not being given the work at all!

And, to my mind at least, herein lies the crux of the issue John raises:- the problem is not that we sell time per se, but rather our business model rewards people for charging by it.

Indeed, if we truly want to know if the industry is changing from the “we sell time” reward model, then the Altman Weil report identifies all we need to know. In there it stipulates that law firm leaders clearly see:

“Efficiency and pricing [as] areas that firms can control to meet the changing marketplace and manage challenges and opportunities.”

And yet despite clearly seeing this:

“The one pricing tactic that has been adopted by a majority of large and small firms is developing data on the cost of services sold. Sixty-seven percent of all firms and 91% of large firms are doing this fundamental analysis, which should enable them to structure more customized fee proposals.”

And while I do commend law firms for trying to establish what a particular type of work might cost, this evidence clearly shows that firms remain stuck in a cost-plus method of charging for services rather than trying to determine what the value is to the client in doing the work – which actually would enable them to structure more customized fee proposals.

To close out this segment, I believe that the Altman Weil report touches on a central problem, and with it a possible solution, to the “we sell time” business model that currently exists in many law firms:

“…in too many firms personal, political and cultural obstacles are hindering pragmatic economic decisions.”

Are we changing it quick enough?

It should be obvious by now that my response here is going to be “no”.

But I wanted to finish by quoting a paragraph in the Altman Weil report that I believe sums up the profession’s glacial attitude to change far better than I can:

“If the strategy is simply to keep up with the pack, it misses the point that most of the pack is itself lagging and just a small increase in pace can distance a firm from its undifferentiated competitors. A firm can never get ahead by merely aspiring to keep pace with sluggish competitors. Vigorous pursuit of opportunities has always paved the way for competitive success.”

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Altman Weil Flash Survey: Has the era of data driven pricing arrived?

Last week saw the publication of Altman Weil’s 2016 Law Firms in Transition Survey. Now in its eighth year, this survey continues to be a good indicator of the market forces law firms are facing and in recent years it has been a good indicator of the fee pressure clients are putting on firms.

So, how have firms been tracking when it comes to pricing pressure issues?

At first blush – well. When asked: “Is your firm doing any of the following to support its pricing strategy?“, “Developing data on cost of service sold” and “Training lawyers to talk with clients about pricing” rank head and shoulders (in first and second spot) above everything else.

AM 1

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Clearly moving in the right direction then, reinforced by the overwhelmingly positive response to: “Is your firm proactively initiating conversations about pricing / budgets to better understand what individual clients want?

AM 2

 

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until we get to this shocker…

AM 3

 

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So, almost half (44%) of law firms are now training lawyers to have the pricing conversation with their clients, a whopping 88% of firms are proactively initiating that conversation – and yet three-quarters (72.2%) of firms only make use of non-hourly based billing methods in response to a client request.

Am I the only one who finds that incredible?

But really, why does it even matter?

Well, here’s your answer:

AM 4

 

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There’s a clear lesson here for anyone that’s willing to listen to it: if you want your firm to be more profitable, be on the front foot when it comes to opportunities to provide alternative fee arrangements.

If you haven’t already, I’d like to recommend you download and read the full survey, if for no other reason than it contains this gem…:

 

AM 5

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Which, if you believe, suggests that around half of all law firm partners are not even aware of the challenges their firms face!

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